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Drunk Driving Archives

What are affirmative drunk driving defenses?

Drunk driving is certainly dangerous, but contrary to popular belief, it is not always the worst option. As surprising as this may sound, there are actually some instances in which a person facing drunk driving charges might successfully argue that he or she was justified in driving under the influence.

Driving without insurance complicates drunk driving charges

If you drive without insurance, you face the possibility of serious consequences, especially if alcohol is involved. If you recently received charges of driving without insurance in conjunction with a drunk driving charge, then you must proceed very carefully. It is very wise to consult with an experienced attorney to closely examine the details of your arrest and prioritize which of your rights you want to protect.

Law enforcement phasing out sobriety checkpoints

Law enforcement throughout Missouri is shifting tactics to apprehend drunk drivers, which could have serious effects on DUI defense. Soon, more than 60 law enforcement agencies throughout the state will lose millions of dollars allocated for sobriety checkpoints, but that doesn't mean that it is any safer to drive after a few beers.

Surprising defenses to drunk driving charges

Facing drunk driving charges is never something anyone wants to do, but we all make mistakes from time to time. However, a drunk driving conviction can carry serious consequences and affect many areas of your life, so it is always wise to consult with an attorney to identify ways you might fight the charges. Depending on the nature of your arrest, there a number of defense strategies a skilled attorney can help you employ.

How are reasonable and suspicion probable cause different?

We've all been there — you're driving down the road after a long day, maybe coming home after a quick stop at the bar. Suddenly, you see the flashing lights behind you and pull over to the side of the road. In many cases, you may not even know why you're being pulled over.

Police want DUI arrestees to say where they had their last drink

A new law in Kansas City may spread the blame around for drivers who drink and then get behind the wheel. Law enforcement has added an element to their questionnaire when pulling over an individual who they suspect has been drinking, or even at sobriety checkpoints. Under the new policy, drivers will be asked where they were last drinking. The measure is intended to crack down on bartenders and establishments that may be regularly serving their patrons alcohol well after the point of intoxication.

Engage with your local authorities before you have to

The freedom to drink responsibly is one of the great rights that America grants its citizens. Even though each state maintains its own statutes about how drinking is to be handled and by whom, alcohol is nothing to be afraid of, in and of itself. It is true that some individuals are more prone to overindulge and engage in risky behavior, but for the majority of the population it is possible to drink regularly and not to run afoul of the law. Even many police officers understand that drinking is a culturally accepted component of the coming-of-age process, as demonstrated in a recent "responsible drinking" event held for Missouri State University students by local police.

Line drawn between blood and breath tests in DUI stops

When you are pulled over because a law enforcement officer has reason to believe that you are driving after drinking, things usually move pretty quickly. At some point during the stop, you might be asked to take a field sobriety test. You might also be asked to take a breath test to determine your blood alcohol concentration. You have the right to refuse that breath test, but that refusal can trigger a different chain of events.

DUI arrests can be devastating, so can DUI convictions

Drunk driving charges are something that might seem kind of harmless, but they aren't anything close to harmless. The fact of the matter is that a drunk driving conviction can bar you from doing certain jobs. It might cause you to have to spend time in jail, pay fines or spend time doing community service. We know that you might not know how to defend yourself against a DUI charge, so we are here to help you with your defense.

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